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Immigration Info Session
May
8
6:00 PM18:00

Immigration Info Session

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Join St. George's Society and award-winning immigration firm Laura Devine Lawyers to learn the nuances of US and UK immigration.

Their team of experts will explain specific visa categories, green cards, US and UK citizenship and recent and expected changes in immigration regulations, policies and practices.

The session will cover:

E Visas
L Visas
O Visas
Green Cards
US Citizenship
UK Citizenship

A networking reception will follow where attendees can ask further questions in a more informal setting.
Light bites and beverages will be served

FREE TO ATTEND


In partnership with

 
 

Laura Devine Law is an award-winning boutique immigration firm. Comprised of 50 dedicated staff and the partners in London and New York, they provide specialist advice on all aspects of immigration to the UK and US, and European free movement assisting individuals, families, SMEs and corporate clients.


Space kindly donated by

 
 
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ROF Lecture: Behind the Throne: A Domestic History of the British Royal Household
Apr
22
6:15 PM18:15

ROF Lecture: Behind the Throne: A Domestic History of the British Royal Household

The Music Party, Philip Mercier, 1733 ©National Portrait Gallery, London.jpg

Behind the Throne: A Domestic History of the British Royal Household

Presented by Adrian Tinniswood OBE

Despite the castles, crown jewels, and other trappings of monarchy, English royals have many of the same issues as average people. They eat, entertain their friends and worry about money. Henry VIII tripped over his dogs. George II threw his son out of the house. James I had to cut back on his alcohol bills. The great difference, however, was that royal families had much more domestic help—people who ran the machine that is the Royal Household. Everyone, from James I’s Master of the Horse down to William IV’s Assistant Table Decker, was there to smooth the sovereign’s path through life. Even today, Elizabeth II has a staff of 1,200. In his lecture, historian Adrian Tinniswood will uncover the reality of five centuries of life at the English court, taking us on a remarkable journey from one Queen Elizabeth to another. He will reconstruct life behind the throne—telling secret domestic details—and will illustrate the daily lives of both clerks and courtiers, crowned heads and court jesters. Adrian will describe the power struggles and petty rivalries that have historically dominated court politics. He will also talk about the shifting idea of the monarchy today, and how their support network still serves as an interface between sovereign and the public. His witty social history of royal life will offer a tour of England's grandest households while commenting on the ever present tension between the throne room and downstairs.

Adrian Tinniswood OBE studied English and Philosophy at Southampton University and was awarded an MPhil at Leicester University. He has acted as a consultant to the National Trust and the Heritage Lottery Fund. He is a Senior Research Fellow in History at the Universuty of Buckingham. He has lectured at several universities in both the United Kingdom and United States, including the University of Oxford and the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of 15 books on architectural and social history including By Permission of Heaven: The True Story of the Great Fire of London, The Verneys, Pirates of Barbary, and The Long Weekend: Life in the English Country House Between the Wars. His latest book on which his lecture is based is Behind the Throne: A Domestic History of the Royal Household (2018). Tinniswood was appointed Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in the 2013 Birthday Honours for services to heritage.


A part of the Royal Oak Foundation's Spring 2019 Lecture Series.

Registration opens 13 February.
St. George’s Society members receive $10 OFF the standard ticket price! Contact us for discount code.

For more information, please call Kayla Smith at 212-480-2889, ext. 201.

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ROF Lecture: A Woman of No Importance: The Spy Who Helped Win WWII
Apr
10
6:15 PM18:15

ROF Lecture: A Woman of No Importance: The Spy Who Helped Win WWII

 
Virginia Hall. Lorna Catling Collection.jpg

A Woman of No Importance: The Spy Who Helped Win WWII

Presented by Sonia Purnell

 

In 1942, the Gestapo sent out an urgent command: "She is the most dangerous of all Allied spies. We must find and destroy her." This spy was Virginia Hall, a young socialite from Baltimore, who, after being rejected from the Foreign Service because of her gender and prosthetic leg, talked her way into the SOE, the WWII British spy organization dubbed Churchill's "ministry of ungentlemanly warfare." Hall, known as the "Madonna of the Resistance," was one of the greatest spies in American and English history, yet her full story remains untold. At a time when sending female secret agents into enemy territory was still strictly forbidden, Hall coordinated a network of spies to report on German troop movements, arranged equipment parachute drops for Resistance fighters, and recruited and trained guerrilla units to ambush enemy convoys and blow up bridges and railroads. Even as her face covered WANTED posters throughout Europe, Hall refused orders to evacuate. She finally escaped in a death-defying climb over of the Pyrenees into Spain, her cover blown, and her associates imprisoned or executed. But, adamant that she had more lives to save, she plunged back into the field with the American OSS secret service, directing partisan armies to back up the Allied forces landing on Normandy beaches. Sonia Purnell will reveal the captivating story of a formidable, yet shockingly overlooked, heroine whose fierce persistence helped win the war.

Sonia Purnell is an acclaimed biographer and journalist who has worked for The Daily Mail, The Sunday Times, and The Guardian. Her book Clementine: The Life of Mrs. Winston Churchill (published as First Lady in the UK) was chosen as a book of the year by The Daily Telegraph and The Independent, and was a finalist for the Plutarch Award. Her first book, Just Boris, was long-listed for the Orwell prize. Her latest book, A Woman of No Importance: The Untold Story of the American Spy Who Helped Win World War II will be published in April 2019. The book is currently in development at Paramount Pictures and slated to star English actress Daisy Ridley known for her recent role in Star Wars: The Force Awakens.


A part of the Royal Oak Foundation's Spring 2019 Lecture Series.

Registration opens 13 February.
St. George’s Society members receive $10 OFF the standard ticket price! Contact us for discount code.

For more information, please call Kayla Smith at 212-480-2889, ext. 201.

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Staffordshire Potteries and Josiah Wedgwood
Mar
27
6:00 PM18:00

Staffordshire Potteries and Josiah Wedgwood

  • The Colonial Dames of America | Abigail Adams Smith Ballroom (map)
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Staffordshire Pottery.jpg

Staffordshire Potteries and Josiah Wedgwood

A Lecture by Nicolas M. Dawes

 

Nicholas M. Dawes will join us for a talk about Staffordshire Potteries in the second half of the 18th century, including the artistic, technological, cultural and commercial influences in the work of England’s best known potter, Josiah Wedgwood I. The illustrated talk will include references to Wedgwood’s contemporaries, parallel trends in decorative arts and a view of Neo-Classical revivalism in the Victorian and Edwardian eras.

 Attendees also are encouraged to bring objects for Mr. Dawes to examine and identify.


Nicholas Dawes is Senior Vice President of Special Collections at Heritage Auctions in New York and former Vice President and auctioneer at Sotheby’s and Phillips, where he ran the European Ceramics department in the early 1980’s. Nicholas grew up near the Staffordshire Potteries in an antiques dealing family and has deep connections to the world of ceramics. He is the author of four standard works on decorative arts and known to many for his frequent appearances as an expert appraiser on PBS’s Antiques Roadshow since its debut in 1996.


Presented by
The Colonial Dames of America
The American Friends of the Georgian Group
St. George’s Society of New York

$45 for members of sponsoring societies
$25 for junior  members of sponsoring societies
$55 for non-members/guests

To RSVP/purchase tickets email admin@cda1890.org or call 212.838.6470

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ROF Lecture: Ciphers, Secrets, and Spies in the Elizabethan Age
Mar
13
6:15 PM18:15

ROF Lecture: Ciphers, Secrets, and Spies in the Elizabethan Age

 
Queen Elizabeth I, by English School. ©National Trust Images.png

Ciphers, Secrets, and Spies in the Elizabethan Age

Presented by Carol Ann Lloyd

 

The Elizabethan era (1558-1603) is often depicted as the “Golden Age” in England’s history— an era of great exploration and military victories in which Queen Elizabeth I is represented in sumptuous clothing and jewels. But the reality, which included religious conflicts that tore families apart, political challenges to Elizabeth’s authority, high levels of poverty and crime, and vulnerability to foreign invasion, was far grimmer. The Queen was considered a Protestant heretic by the rulers of Europe and numerous plots were hatched to dethrone her and replace her with Catholic Mary Queen of Scots. Elizabeth’s closest courtiers tried to protect her. William Cecil (later Lord Burghley) was the first to oversee the gathering of intelligence and was aided by Francis Walsingham, another of Elizabeth's most loyal ministers known as the "Spymaster.” Walsingham's network of clandestine agents moved throughout England and Europe using their contacts and skills in navigating court politics to safeguard their Queen. They unearthed a series of threats, including one led by an invasion of priests who had been trained abroad and were sent to prepare England for a Catholic rebellion. The priests scattered throughout the country and were hidden in “priest-holes” by Catholic families in places such as Baddesley Clinton and Coughton Court in Warwickshire. Other houses involved in this period of intrigue include Oxburgh Hall in Norfolk, and Scotney Castle in Kent—all National Trust houses.

Carol Ann Lloyd will describe this tumultuous time with its secret plots, intercepted and decoded messages, and assassination attempts. She will explore dark corners of Elizabethan English history and reveal how the ability to control information became the most potent tool of the realm.

Carol Ann Lloyd is a popular speaker who shares the stories of Shakespeare and English history. She is the former Manager of Visitor Education at Folger Shakespeare Library, where she gave workshops and tours about Shakespeare and Early Modern England. Carol Ann has presented programs at the Smithsonian, Folger Shakespeare Library, Agecroft Hall, and TEDx, among other venues. Ms. Lloyd is a member of the National Speakers Association.


A part of the Royal Oak Foundation's Spring 2019 Lecture Series.

Registration opens 13 February.
St. George’s Society members receive $10 OFF the standard ticket price! Contact us for discount code.

For more information, please call Kayla Smith at 212-480-2889, ext. 201.

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The Journal of a Georgian Gentleman
Feb
19
6:00 PM18:00

The Journal of a Georgian Gentleman

  • The Colonial Dames of America | Abigail Adams Smith Ballroom (map)
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The Journal of a Georgian Gentleman: The Life and Times of Richard Hall 1729-1801

A Lecture by Author Mike Rendell

 

The historical value and interest of diaries is not so much in their accounts of great historical events but in their ability to convey the quality – the sights, smells and textures – of everyday life that would otherwise be lost to us.

A silhouette of Richard Hall, made by his daughter Martha.

A silhouette of Richard Hall, made by his daughter Martha.

It is everyday life that abounds in the diaries of Richard Hall, a sometimes pious Baptist silk hosier who kept shop at one end or other of the old London Bridge through much of the late eighteenth century. He recorded what he ate, what he purchased, how he slept and above all what the weather was like in near-obsessive detail. He charts the hurly-burly of family life – he had two marriages and numerous children – his sometimes tumultuous relationship with his church, and his boundless curiousity about almost everything – from astronomy to the latest fashions.

Richard lived between 1729 and 1801 and I am fortunate enough to have his diaries, his account books, his jottings and other bits and pieces.

Author Mike Rendell has enjoyed sifting through the rich treasure trove of his papers to present a portrait of a flawed but thoroughly likeable ‘Georgian gentleman’.


Simon Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice, Earl of Kerry

Mike Rendell was born in Bristol and read Law at Southampton University. After graduation he joined a Bristol law firm where he was a partner for thirty years.

He specialized in conveyancing and wrote a weekly legal advice column in the local press, as well as contributing to various journals and publications on legal issues connected with property ownership. He retired in 2003 and he and his wife Philippa now live a nomadic existence which takes them from the edge of Dartmoor in England to the Jalon Valley in Spain.

He is currently working on a novel, to be entitled One London Bridge, about a family living in London in the Georgian era. Mike regards himself as the custodian of a vast array of family papers which have somehow survived through the centuries, and it is his ambition to bring as much of it as possible into the public arena.

He also speaks regularly on 18th century-related topics, both in Spain and in England, to History Societies, Genealogical Groups, Colleges, Women’s Institutes and Probus Groups. He is always looking for new areas where he can share with others his love of all things Georgian.


Presented by
The Colonial Dames of America
The American Friends of the Georgian Group
Royal Oak Foundation
St. George’s Society of New York

$45 for members of sponsoring societies
$25 for junior  members of sponsoring societies
$55 for non-members/guests

To RSVP/purchase tickets email admin@cda1890.org or call 212.838.6470

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BREXIT & Transatlantic Business with Duncan Edwards
Feb
12
6:00 PM18:00

BREXIT & Transatlantic Business with Duncan Edwards

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BREXIT & Transatlantic Business

presented by Duncan Edwards & The Anglosphere Society

Amanda Bowman & The Anglosphere Society

Cordially invite you to attend a briefing with

Duncan Edwards, CEO of BritishAmerican Business

To discuss the implications and challenges of BREXIT for Transatlantic Business

 
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Reception: 6:00 PM
Program: 6:45 – 7:45 PM


Presented by The Anglosphere Society

 
 

St. George’s Society members receive $10 OFF the standard ticket price!

Seating limited to 35. Please RSVP by Tuesday 5 February 2019.


To RSVP or for questions, please contact Rose Sullivan at rose@theanglospheresociety.org or at 201.447.0847.

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ESU Talk: The Lady of the Tower:  A Story of the Keeper’s Wife
Feb
7
6:30 PM18:30

ESU Talk: The Lady of the Tower: A Story of the Keeper’s Wife

 
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“Even the kept must have their keepers.” So opens Elizabeth St.John’s critically-acclaimed historical fiction novel of her ancestress’s life in the most famous prison in the world—The Tower of London. Orphaned Lucy St.John defies English society by carving her own path through the decadent Stuart court. In 1609, the early days of the rule of James I—time of glittering pageantry and cutthroat ambition, Lucy catches the eye of the Earl of Suffolk, but her envious sister Barbara is determined to ruin her happiness. Exiling herself from the court, Lucy finds her own path, becoming mistress of the Tower of London. Riding the coattails of the king’s favorite, the Duke of Buckingham, the fortunes of the St.Johns rise to dizzying heights. But with great wealth comes betrayal, leaving Lucy to fight for her survival—and her honor—in a world of patronage and deceit.

Elizabeth St.John tells this dramatic true story of love and betrayal through the eyes of her ancestor Lucy and her family’s surviving diaries, letters and court papers.

Simon Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice, Earl of Kerry

Raised in England, Elizabeth St.John spends her time between California, England, and the past. A best-selling author, historian and genealogist, she has tracked down family papers and residences from Nottingham Castle, Lydiard Park, and Castle Fonmon to the Tower of London. Although the family sold a few castles and country homes along the way (it's hard to keep a good castle going these days), Elizabeth's family still occupy them - in the form of portraits, memoirs, and gardens that carry their imprint. And the occasional ghost. But that's a different story...


Presented by the English Speaking Union of New York & Historic Royal Palaces

 
 

St. George’s Society members receive ESU & HRP Member price — $5 OFF!

For more information, please contact Ed Mohylowski at newyork@esuus.org or 212-818-1200, ext. 218.

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ESU Talk: Shakespeare the family man?
Jan
28
6:30 PM18:30

ESU Talk: Shakespeare the family man?

 
ESU Lecture - Shakespeare the family man.png
 

William Shakespeare was a son, a husband, a father, an actor, a poet, a dramatist, a collaborator…and a businessman. Darren Freebury-Jones explores Shakespeare’s legacy by charting his life in a largely chronological arrangement, from birth to death in Stratford-upon-Avon.

Simon Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice, Earl of Kerry

Darren Freebury-Jones is a lecturer in Shakespeare Studies at the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust in Stratford-upon-Avon. He has taught at the Shakespeare Centre in the TLab program for The English-Speaking Union. His 2016 doctoral thesis examined Thomas Kyd’s influence on Shakespeare’s early work.


Presented by the English Speaking Union of New York

 
 

St. George’s Society members receive ESU Member price — $5 OFF!

For more information, please contact Ed Mohylowski at newyork@esuus.org or 212-818-1200, ext. 218.

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Burns Night with Saint Thomas Church
Jan
25
7:00 PM19:00

Burns Night with Saint Thomas Church

  • Bonnell Hall at Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church (map)
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burnsnight.jpg

Burns Night

with Saint Thomas Church Fifth Avenue

Celebrate Burns Night with Saint Thomas Church

Enjoy a reception with wine and delicious hors d’oeuvres followed by a traditional Scottish dinner with great Scottish music and dancing.

Festive Scottish dress encouraged.

Tickets | $75 per person
Tables of 10 | $700

Please note that all reservations and cancellations must be made by noon on Monday, January 21.


Presented by Saint Thomas Church Fifth Avenue

 
 

For more information, please contact Ann Hall Kaplan at akaplan@SaintThomasChurch.org.

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British Mums NYC Holiday Party
Nov
30
8:00 PM20:00

British Mums NYC Holiday Party

Join British Mums NYC for festivities, bar snacks, entertainment and some holiday fun!

Please RSVP by November 23, 2018 to Naomi Burl at naomi@britishmumsnyc.com

Non-refundable payment to be sent to paypal.me/BritishMumsNYC no later than November 23, 2018.
Please remember to include the names of ALL persons attending on the payment reference.

A portion of the proceeds will benefit St. George's Society of New York.

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Lismore Castle: 'Built by King John, plumbed by Adele Astaire'
Nov
7
6:15 PM18:15

Lismore Castle: 'Built by King John, plumbed by Adele Astaire'

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Lismore Castle: 'Built by King John, plumbed by Adele Astaire'

Presented by William Cavendish, Earl of Burlington

When Paddy Leigh Fermor wrote this in a letter to The Duchess of Devonshire (“Debo”), Lismore Castle in County Waterford, Ireland, had been in the Cavendish family for centuries, since it was built by King John in 1185 and purchased from Sir Walter Raleigh in 1602. Since that time Lismore has been besieged, lain derelict, rebuilt and redecorated. The 6th Duke of Devonshire was responsible for the castle’s renovations from 1812-1822 that resulted in its present Gothic Revival appearance. During the mid-19th century John Gregory Crace, the leading maker of Gothic Revival furniture, and his partner designer A.W.N. Pugin were commissioned to transform the ruined chapel into a medieval-style banqueting hall. The castle also contains some of the finest examples of domestic Pugin furniture still in private hands. The most recent renovations done by William Cavendish, Earl of Burlington, and his wife Laura bring the castle into the 21st century. In 2005 Lord Burlington converted the derelict West Wing into a state-of-the-art contemporary gallery and arts center.

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Lord Burlington will give Royal Oak members an illustrated personal tour of Lismore castle, where Adele Astaire, wife of the younger son of the 9th Duke of Devonshire—and sister and former dancing partner of Fred Astaire—lived until her husband’s death in 1941. Lord Burlington will guide us through the Castle’s fluctuating 800-year history; show the remarkable Pugin interiors; trace the Cavendish family’s American connections; and explain how the castle has evolved into a much-loved family home, as well as a center for international contemporary art and education.


A part of the Royal Oak Foundation's Fall 2018 Lecture Series.

Registration opens 4 September.
St. George’s Society members receive $10 OFF the standard ticket price! Contact us for discount code.

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Churchill and the Cabinet War Rooms
Oct
31
6:15 PM18:15

Churchill and the Cabinet War Rooms

Churchill War Room. By permission of The Imperial War Museums.jpg

Churchill and the Cabinet War Rooms

Presented by Phil Reed 

History was made in the Cabinet War Rooms—an underground bunker hidden beneath the streets of Westminster—a nerve center where Winston Churchill and his inner circle directed the Second World War. Preserved and opened by the Imperial War Museum in 1984, the War Rooms are a popular London destination. Phil Reed, Director from 1993 to 2016, expanded the Cabinet War Rooms and developed the Churchill Museum, opened by Her Majesty The Queen in 2005. Phil’s lecture will describe the evolution of the Cabinet War Rooms, alongside the evolution of Winston Churchill from schoolboy, to statesman, and finally, to the global icon he is today. Indeed, the Oscar-winning film Darkest Hour, for which Phil served as the historical consultant, put Winston Churchill firmly back on center stage 50 years after his death and lionized him for later generations. Phil will talk about how the film portrayed Churchill as a man, rather than the demi-god he is so often portrayed as today. He will track Churchill’s development, his public persona, and his self-perception while sharing unique insights into the making of the most successful cinematic portrayal of Churchill to date. He will guide us through the labyrinth of rooms and corridors that sheltered the Prime Minister and his cabinet from the German bombing raids, and explore the highlights of the Churchill Museum to convey the story of Churchill’s life and legacy.


A part of the Royal Oak Foundation's Fall 2018 Lecture Series.

Registration open 4 September.
St. George’s Society members receive $10 OFF the standard ticket price! Contact us for discount code.

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From Dickens to Downton: Victorian and Edwardian Food
Oct
11
6:15 PM18:15

From Dickens to Downton: Victorian and Edwardian Food

The dining table, decorated and set for Christmas dinner, in the Dining Room at Standen House and Garden, West Sussex ©National Trust Images Chris Lacey 1113219.jpg

From Dickens to Downton: Victorian and Edwardian Food

Presented by Carl Raymond

Journey through British food and dining traditions from the mid-19th century through the early part of the 20th century. Beginning with a look at food references in the work of Charles Dickens which helped establish some of Britain's most cherished culinary traditions, the talk will continue all the way thorough to the world of great town and country houses known to lovers of Downton Abbey and Upstairs Downstairs, this talk will take a look at dining tables both upstairs and downstairs as well as inside and outside the house, including some National Trust properties such as Petworth House and Standen House. Carl Raymond will lead the audience on an illustrated tour of some of the classic dishes of the Victorian and Edwardian periods and discuss their background, how they were prepared and how they were served. In addition, he will discuss cultural and social trends and influences that affected eating and entertaining from the Industrial Revolution to the beginning of World War I.

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Carl Raymond is a food historian, writer and museum educator. He has worked at the Merchant's House Museum as well as King Manor Museum in education and programming. Carl trained at French Culinary Institute as well as the Institute for Culinary Education and holds a diploma in Culinary Arts. He has taught recreational cooking classes throughout New York City and has lectured on food history for the Merchant's House Museum, the National Arts Club, the Metropolitan Opera Guild, St. George's Society, Historic Royal Palaces and the English Speaking Union. He was a contributing writer on SAVORING GOTHAM: A Food Lover's Companion to New York City (Oxford University Press) and is at work on his own book, a culinary history of the Gilded Age.


A part of the Royal Oak Foundation's Fall 2018 Lecture Series.

Registration opens 4 September.
St. George’s Society members receive $10 OFF the standard ticket price! Contact us for discount code.


Main Image: Dining Room at Standen House and Garden, West Sussex ©National Trust Images/Chris Lacey
Images (L to R): 
The Kitchen at Petworth House and Park, West Sussex; Victorian ice cream making utensils in the Larder at Petworth House, West Sussex; The kitchen at Lanhydrock, Cornwall - Copper containers sit on the range ©National Trust Images, Andreas von Einsiedel 

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Bingo Night
Aug
2
6:30 PM18:30

Bingo Night

Bingo Night

Join the Mountbatten Fundraising Committee for their first Bingo night! 

Enjoy an extended happy hour, music and the best bingo this side of the pond.

$10 per person


About the Mountbatten Fundraising Committee

Comprised of Mountbatten interns, the Mountbatten Fundraising Committee hosts fun and creative activities that raise important funds for the charitable programs of St. George's Society of New York.

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Flag Day Parade
Jun
14
11:00 AM11:00

Flag Day Parade

Flag Day Parade

Celebrate Flag Day with St. George's Society!

Join us as we participate in the annual Flag Day Parade hosted by The Sons of the Revolution in the State of New York. 

We will march from City Hall Park to Fraunces Tavern Museum. 

  • 11:00 am Arrive at City Hall
  • 12:00 pm Parade Begins (departing from City Hall)

Lunch will be provided for all participants. 

Interested in marching with St. George's Society? Email us at hello@stgeorgessociety.org to sign up!

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Wetherby-Pembridge Education Evening
Jun
6
6:00 PM18:00

Wetherby-Pembridge Education Evening

How To Be A Successful Parent

Barnaby Lenon, Chairman of the Independent School’s Council

Join Wetherby-Pembridge School for their last Education Evening of the academic year on with Barnaby Lenon. 

Barnaby Lenon is Chairman of the Independent School’s Council, has been a governor of nice schools and was head of Harrow for 12 years. 


Presented by Wetherby-Pembridge School

 
 

Wetherby-Pembridge is an independent day school on the Upper East Side. Based on the successful traditions of our London schools, Wetherby-Pembridge School is both highly academic and dedicated to nurturing every child in our care.

By adapting the merits of both single-sex and co-educational provision, we have developed a unique offering to New York educational choices.

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Dining with Mr. Darcy: A Look at Georgian and Regency Food
May
21
6:30 PM18:30

Dining with Mr. Darcy: A Look at Georgian and Regency Food

Dining with Mr. Darcy:
 

 

A Look at Georgian and Regency Food

A Talk by Carl Raymond

Dining with Mr. Darcy is an overview of the food world throughout the Georgian period and the Regency. The 18th century witnessed great changes in all forms of social life from the growth of the middle class, the of rise industrialization, to a rapid increase on the consumption of new luxury goods. Middle and upper class Georgian tables groaned with succulent roasts, savory puddings, and luscious desserts. With a special  focus on the writings of Jane Austen and food as presented in her novels, Raymond discusses in detail what was and wasn’t on Georgian tables, how it was cooked, as well as new inventions in the kitchen and garden, and even what Jane and her family cooked and ate themselves. Most of all, this talk will consider what one might have encountered should one have had the coveted opportunity to share a meal with Mr. Darcy, himself.

Simon Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice, Earl of Kerry

Carl Raymond, a food historian, writer and museum educator, returns to the ESU following his very well received previous talks, At the Queen’s Table and From Dickens to Downton. Carl has worked at the Merchant's House Museum as well as King Manor Museum but trained at the French Culinary Institute as well as the Institute for Culinary Education. He holds a diploma in Culinary Arts. Carl has taught recreational cooking classes throughout New York City and has lectured on food history at the Merchant's House Museum, the National Arts Club, the Metropolitan Opera Guide and the English Speaking Union.  Recently, he was a contributing writer on SAVORING GOTHAM: A Food Lover's Companion to New York City and is at work on his own book—a culinary history of the Gilded Age.


Presented by the English Speaking Union of New York

 
 

St. George’s Society members receive $10 OFF the standard ticket price!

For more information, please contact Ed Mohylowski at newyork@esuus.org or 212-818-1200, ext. 218.

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Immigration Info Session
May
21
6:00 PM18:00

Immigration Info Session

Immigration Info Session

Join St. George's Society and award-winning immigration firm Laura Devine Law to learn the nuances of US and UK immigration.

Their team of experts will explain specific visa categories, green cards, US and UK citizenship and recent and expected changes in immigration regulations, policies and practices.

The session will cover:

  • E Visas

  • L Visas

  • O Visas

  • Green Cards

  • US Citizenship

  • UK Citizenship

A networking reception will follow where attendees can ask further questions in a more informal setting.
Light bites and beverages featuring Chapel Down sparkling wine will be served

FREE TO ATTEND


In partnership with

 
 

Laura Devine Law is an award-winning boutique immigration firm. Comprised of 50 dedicated staff and the partners in London and New York, they provide specialist advice on all aspects of immigration to the UK and US, and European free movement assisting individuals, families, SMEs and corporate clients.


Space kindly donated by

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Portrait of a Woman in Silk: Hidden Histories of the British Atlantic World
May
17
6:15 PM18:15

Portrait of a Woman in Silk: Hidden Histories of the British Atlantic World

Portrait of a Woman in Silk: Hidden Histories of the British Atlantic World

Presented by Dr. Zara Anishanslin

While looking through silks in the Textile Study Room of London’s Victoria & Albert Museum, historian Dr. Zara Anishanslin was struck by similarities between mid-18th century English silks and a dress featured in a portrait by Robert Feke hanging at the Winterthur Museum. From her discovery, she began to research and explore the cultural history of the 18th century British Atlantic world, where dresses like the one pictured often declared the social, economic and political capital of the wearer. Her resulting story revolves around the mid-18th-century silk dress from the portrait and involves the famed English designer of its pattern, Anna Maria Garthwaite; the Spitalfields weaver of the fabric, Simon Julins; the wealthy American owner of the dress, Anne Shippen Willing; and the portrait artist, Robert Feke. Tracing the full biographies of this network of four people, Dr. Anishanslin ultimately uncovered a whole world of hidden histories of thousands of people, things, ideas, and events connected to this portrait of a woman from one of most powerful families in the Colonies.

Dr. Anishanslin will show how this dress demonstrates the popularity of botanical designs in fashion, and discuss how the production and selling of such goods in the 18th-century British Atlantic marketplace created a consumer community that tied all of its inhabitants together.

Dr. Zara Anishanslin is a historian and professor specializing in Early American and Atlantic World History, with a focus on 18th-century material culture. Dr. Zara Anishanslin has taught at CUNY and Columbia University, and since 2016, she has been Assistant Professor of History and Art History at the University of Delaware. She was a Royal Oak Foundation Scholar at The Attingham Trust’s 2017 Attingham Summer School. Her recent book, Portrait of a Woman in Silk: Hidden Histories of the British Atlantic World, published in 2016 by Yale University Press was a finalist for 2017 Best First Book Prize, Berkshire Conference of Women Historians.


A part of the Royal Oak Foundation's Spring 2018 Lecture Series.

St. George’s Society members receive $10 OFF the standard ticket price! Contact us for discount code.

Main Image: Anna Maria Garthwaite, silk design, 1743. Photo © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

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Long to Reign Over Us: Reflections on An Extraordinary Reign
May
16
6:00 PM18:00

Long to Reign Over Us: Reflections on An Extraordinary Reign

Long to Reign Over Us

Reflections On An Extraordinary Reign

In celebration of
the Reign of
Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II
and the wedding of
His Royal Highness Prince Henry of Wales
to Ms. Meghan Markle

A Conversation at the Reception with

 

Barbara Taylor Bradford OBE
Best Selling Novelist

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Dr. Amanda Foreman
Renowned Biographer and Historian

 

Moderated by

Amanda Bowman
Founder, The Anglosphere Society

Registration and Cocktails, 6:00 PM
Reflections on the reign of the Queen, 6:45 PM
Loyal Toast and Toast to the Royal Couple, 7:30 PM
Celebration continues, 7:30 – 8:00 PM

Cocktail Attire


Presented by The Anglosphere Society

 
 

St. George’s Society members receive $25 OFF the standard ticket price!

Net proceeds will go to St. George's Society and Prince Harry’s charity Walking With the Wounded


To RSVP or for questions, please contact Rose Sullivan at rose@theanglospheresociety.org or at 201.447.0847.

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The History of Gracie Mansion
Apr
18
6:00 PM18:00

The History of Gracie Mansion

The History of Gracie Mansion

A Lecture by Paul Gunther, Curator

Join us for a reception and lecture on one of the finest Georgian era buildings remaining in New York City led by Mansion Curator, Paul Gunther.


Presented by The Colonial Dames of America

 
 

St. George’s Society members receive $10 OFF the standard ticket price!

To purchase/reserve tickets email admin@cda1890.org or call 212.838.5489.

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Wetherby-Pembridge Spring Open House
Apr
17
9:00 AM09:00

Wetherby-Pembridge Spring Open House

Wetherby-Pembridge Spring Open House

Join Wetherby-Pembridge on 17th April for their Spring Open House.

Meet Miss Kate Bailey, Head of School, and other members of the team to gain more information about the school's vision, ethos and curriculum. A guided tour will follow so you can see all classes in session.


Presented by  Wetherby-Pembridge School

 
 

Wetherby-Pembridge is an independent day school on the Upper East Side. Based on the successful traditions of our London schools, Wetherby-Pembridge School is both highly academic and dedicated to nurturing every child in our care.

By adapting the merits of both single-sex and co-educational provision, we have developed a unique offering to New York educational choices.

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Lansdowne: The Last Great Whig
Apr
13
6:15 PM18:15

Lansdowne: The Last Great Whig

Lansdowne: The Last Great Whig

Presented by Simon Petty-Fitzmaurice, Earl of Kerry

Henry Charles Keith Petty-Fitzmaurice, 5th Marquess of Lansdowne (1845–1927), was one of the last hereditary aristocrats to wield power by virtue of his birth—and he used it to establish himself as a force to be reckoned with in British politics for half a century.

Simon Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice, Earl of Kerry

Simon Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice, Earl of Kerry

Simon Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice, Earl of Kerry, will discuss his ancestor and trace the long arc of Lansdowne’s career, which included service as Governor-General of Canada, Viceroy of India, Secretary of State for War, Foreign Secretary, and Leader of the House of Lords. He will present the man and politician in the context of his era, offering insight into his own life and achievements and also fascinating details about his interactions with the leading personalities and contemporary events of his day. He will show how Lord Lansdowne was a moderate progressive, honest and courteous to the last, trusted by everyone, and struggling—as did so many of his class and generation—with the decline of British power that followed the end of World War I.

His story, based on private family archives, is that of a statesman who played a major role at a pivotal moment in the history of the United Kingdom.


A part of the Royal Oak Foundation's Spring 2018 Lecture Series.

St. George’s Society members receive $10 OFF the standard ticket price! Contact us for discount code.

Main Image: Philip de László, 5th Marquess of Lansdowne in the robes of the Order of the Garter, 1920

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Margaret Thatcher: Britain Transformed
Apr
5
6:30 PM18:30

Margaret Thatcher: Britain Transformed

Margaret Thatcher: Britain Transformed

A Lecture by Noel Sloan

Margaret Thatcher was one of the outstanding leaders of the 20th century: she had a radical vision and implemented it. She changed Britain so much that even her opponents came to adopt her policies, and some of her ideas have been implemented by countries around the world.

In the 1970s, Britain was regarded as the "sick man of Europe," a country whose governments were unable to address the problems of a weak economy and industrial unrest. Under Thatcher’s leadership, Britain's economy, by the end of the 1980s, had become a model for other countries to copy. Once again Britain's influence was felt around the world. Her achievements include cutting income tax rates while also reducing public debt, privatizing state-owned businesses, taming militant trade unions, and contributing to the collapse of Soviet communism.

Noel Sloan describes how Britain's Prime Minister led this transformation. He discusses Margaret Thatcher's vision for her country and her extraordinary leadership. He assesses her achievements and her place in history.

Simon Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice, Earl of Kerry

Noel Sloan is an international banker who has worked in London and New York. He lived in Britain throughout Margaret Thatcher's time as Prime Minister, and he brings to this subject both his experience of Britain in the 1980s and his academic training in politics. Noel has a Master's degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics from Trinity College, Oxford. He was an English-Speaking Union Scholar at The Hotchkiss School and is a National Patron of the English-Speaking Union of the United States. Noel lives in Manhattan and Salisbury, CT.  He has lectured widely about Margaret Thatcher in the US and the UK.


Presented by the English Speaking Union of New York

 
 

St. George’s Society members receive $10 OFF the standard ticket price!

For more information, please contact Ed Mohylowski at newyork@esuus.org or 212-818-1200, ext. 218.

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Hidden Connections: Slavery and the British Country House
Apr
5
6:15 PM18:15

Hidden Connections: Slavery and the British Country House

Hidden Connections: Slavery and the British Country House

Presented by Dr. Madge Dresser

The British country house in all its opulence and refinement seems worlds away from the fetid horrors of a slave ship. However the trade in enslaved Africans and slave-produced goods fueled the wealth that funded the creation of many 17th-to-19th-century British stately homes. Slavery-related houses appear throughout the British Isles and are concentrated in the major slaving ports of London, Bristol and Liverpool. About 10% of elite country houses has associations with slavery, but other houses had indirect ties and consumed slave-produced goods. Some of Britain’s aristocratic house owners’ money resulted from the slave trade itself—invested in the South Sea Company whose purpose was to sell slaves to the Spanish Colonies. Others married heiresses with ties to plantations such as Baron Thomas Onslow, who built a Palladian mansion at Clandon Park in Surrey (NT) ‘owing to his judicious marriage to the heiress of a West Indian fortune.’ Even materials used in these treasure houses resulted from slave activities such as ‘Spanish mahogany’ staircases and mahogany furniture which actually derived from Caribbean slave plantations.

The Balcony Room at Dyrham Park, Gloucestershire. Photo ©National Trust Images/Andreas von Einsiedel

The Balcony Room at Dyrham Park, Gloucestershire. Photo ©National Trust Images/Andreas von Einsiedel

Profits from slave labor at sugar plantations—whose products appeared on the country house dining table—aided family fortunes and funded stately home remodeling such as at Penryhn Castle (NT) whose Pennant family owned five plantations in Jamaica. These renovations were also linked to the wealth generated in the slave colonies of Virginia and the Carolinas. British family portraits might feature black servants, often as turbaned young pages at the side of their master or mistress as at Belton House in Lincolnshire (NT). The kneeling black figures adorning Dyrham Park's (NT) interior are best understood against the longstanding family connections with slavery.

Historian and Professor Dr. Madge Dresser will show these houses and explore some of the stories behind their connections with slavery to reflect on what they mean for our understanding of these beautiful buildings.


A part of the Royal Oak Foundation's Spring 2018 Lecture Series.

St. George’s Society members receive $10 OFF the standard ticket price! Contact us for discount code.

Main Image: The rotunda at Ickworth, Suffolk. Photo ©National Trust Images/Arnhel de Serra

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H-1B Visa Info Session
Mar
1
8:00 AM08:00

H-1B Visa Info Session

  • Space kindly donated by Mountbatten Institute (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The H-1B is one of the most sought-after work visas allowing foreign professionals to work in the US. Due to the limited number of these issued each year, the application process is highly competitive not just amongst foreign nationals but also US employers looking to hire talent.

With the 1st April deadline approaching, anyone looking to file should start working on their application soon.

Join St. George's Society and award-winning immigration firm Laura Devine Law to learn the nuances of H-1B visas and the H-1B quota.

The session will cover:

  • What the H-1B visa is and who can benefit from it

  • Application requirements, timing and cost

  • Alternatives if your application is not selected or rejected

  • Opportunity to ask questions and discuss complicated or problematic cases

Continental breakfast will be provided.

FREE TO ATTEND
Advance registration requested as spaces are limited.


In partnership with

 
 
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Carol Concert & Tree Lighting
Dec
3
4:30 PM16:30

Carol Concert & Tree Lighting

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Carol Concert
& Tree Lighting

Join for this spectacular holiday tradition!

The Queen Elizabeth II Garden hosts the tree lighting ceremony with carols performed by the British International School of New York choir and the Trinity Youth Chorus.

Enjoy special guests, songs, and holiday cheer. The celebration continues with a reception with a buffet, spiced apple cider, beer, wine and soda.

Carol Concert & Tree Lighting, 4:30pm
Queen Elizabeth II September 11th Garden
11 Hanover Square, NYC

Reception, 5pm
Ulysses
95 Pearl Street, NYC

Adults: $65 per person
includes beer & wine
Children: $25 per person

OPEN TO PUBLIC. ALL ARE WELCOME.

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